≡ Menu

White Wine Cake

An unexpected combination of white wine and cinnamon makes this white wine cake totally addictive. It’s beautiful, ultra-moist, and so easy!

White Wine Cake

One night last week, I was scrolling through Yummly and Pinterest as I was about to fall asleep.  I think it was around 1 or 2AM, which is when I typically do the bulk of my recipe browsing.  Around that time of night I should probably be sleeping because I do have a full time job and therefore need to wake up at a reasonable hour in the morning.  But I just can’t help myself.  I have to recipe browse.  And what am I doing up until 1 or 2 in the morning to begin with?  Cooking, of course.  Because I always come across recipes that I just HAVE to try.  And since I sit in an office all day, when else can I try these recipes besides during the hours of 9 PM and 1 AM?

And why do I come across these recipes?  Because I’m recipe browsing on Pinterest and Yummly.  Hmm, I think I’ve pinpointed the problem here…  It probably would help the cause if I didn’t scroll through Yummly and Pinterest before going to sleep, so then I wouldn’t see all these recipes that I must try.  But where’s the fun in that?  Recipe browsing is a full-on hobby for me.

Besides the ubiquitous Pinterest, Yummly is one of my favorite recipe browsing sites.  On the Yummly iPhone app, I scroll through sections like “Trending Recipes” and “Weeknight Dinner Ideas”.  I also use the “Yum” button to save recipes I come across online to my Yummly recipe box.  This is a super quick and convenient way to keep all the recipes that catch your eye in one place.  For example, you can save my recipes to your Yummly recipe box using the orange “Yum” button that is above and below the recipe!

White Wine Cake

So back to that night last week.  As I was scrolling through Yummly recipes, I came across something called “crack cake.”  With a name like that, how can you not click over to the recipe?  Crack cake picture and not clicking—it’s like an oxymoron.

So of course I had to try crack cake (duh!).  And I’ll be honest, the first time I tried it, it didn’t quite live up to the hype.  The flavor of the cake was totally delicious and “crack”-worthy, but I found that the glaze wasn’t quite right.  It was too thin, there was way too much of it, and it didn’t absorb into the cake very well.  It also made a mess as I was pouring it over the top of the cake.  A sugary, sticky, syrupy mess.  Ain’t nobody got time for that when it’s one o’clock in the morning.  Or ever, actually.

To tweak the glaze, I looked up the glaze we use for my mom’s orange Bundt cake (which I need to share with you ASAP).  The glaze is the perfect consistency, perfect amount, and seeps into the cake evenly and beautifully to create a super moist Bundt cake.  So I altered the ingredients to match the flavors of the white wine cake (basically I added wine.  What could be wrong with that?).  I poked holes in the bottom of the cake before pouring the glaze so it really gets into the middle instead of just pooling around the outside, and I added it all to the cake while still in the pan, instead of reserving some to pour over the top (which is what caused the sticky mess in the original recipe).  The result was pure perfection.  Pure.  Perfection.  A perfectly moist cake with a perfect amount of cinnamon flavor and a perfect amount of subtle white wine flavor.  Let me repeat.  Pure. Perfection.

Quick Tip: To make the Bundt cake come out of your pan beautifully, watch these two videos!  They tell you the two secrets to a Bundt that slides right out of the pan.

1. How to prepare the pan:

2. How to remove the cake:

Or if you don’t want to watch the videos, here’s my summary:

First, you want to grease your pan with either butter (or margarine) dusted with flour, or (the easier option and therefore the much more preferable option for me), use cooking spray with flour.  It’s like regular cooking spray but with the addition of flour.  I use Pam Baking Spray.  Second, invert the cake out of the pan and onto your serving dish (a plate or cake stand) after it cools for 10 minutes.  Not right when it comes out of the oven, and not after it has cooled completely.  Set a timer for 10 minutes after it comes out of the oven, and invert it then.  And that’s it!  My cakes always come out perfectly using those two tricks.

You are going to completely fall in love with the flavor of this cake.  It doesn’t taste too much like wine, and it doesn’t taste too much like cinnamon.  It tastes like a perfectly married combination of the two where you can’t quite distinguish where the delicious flavor is coming from but who cares because it’s delicious.  So if you are picturing a booze-soaked cake, this isn’t it.  The wine is subtle but totally necessary to make this cake amazing and intriguing and way too addicting.  I repeat—addicting.

I used this Barkan Sauvignon Blanc and it was delicious!  Any dry or semi-sweet white wine will work well.

Barkan-Classic-Sauvignon-Blanc-2012

This white wine cake is totally delicious and you must make it right away.  I’ve got an even better idea—make it for Purim!  Purim is a Jewish holiday coming up in March (I can’t wait!), and two of the holiday’s food-related activities are drinking alcohol and eating hamantaschen  (recipe coming soon!).  A white wine cake will be such an amazing addition to your Purim meal alongside your beautiful hamantashan!  It’s the perfect Purim-themed dessert.  I’m telling you, this cake is perfect in all ways.

The only thing that’s not perfect about it is how fast it disappears.  You’re going to want a slice of white wine cake with your morning coffee, as an afternoon snack, as a late-night sweet tooth craving, and of course at your Purim meal.  If it makes it to your Purim meal.  I would probably go ahead and make two cakes from the beginning so you can ensure one of the cakes makes it to Purim.  Enjoy!

Yum

5.0 from 4 reviews
White Wine Cake
 
Cuisine: Pareve
Serves: 12
Ingredients
  • 1 yellow cake mix
  • 1 (3.4 ounce) vanilla instant pudding mix
  • ¾ cup white wine
  • ¾ cup vegetable oil
  • 4 eggs
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • For the glaze:
  • ⅔ cup sugar
  • ¼ cup butter (or margarine)
  • ⅓ cup white wine
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Prepare Bundt pan by spraying with baking spray with flour (I use Pam baking spray) or buttering and dusting with flour. Set aside.
  2. In a large bowl, combine yellow cake mix, vanilla pudding, white wine, vegetable oil, eggs, cinnamon, and vanilla. Mix with an electric mixer for 2 minutes, until the batter is completely smooth.
  3. Pour batter into greased Bundt pan and bake for 55 minutes, or until the cake springs back when touched.
  4. minutes before the cake is done, make the glaze: Melt the sugar and butter (or margarine) in a small saucepan over medium heat. Bring to a simmer and cook for 2 minutes, stirring constantly. Remove from heat and add the white wine.
  5. When the cake comes out of the oven, poke holes in the bottom of the cake with a toothpick. Pour the glaze evenly over the cake. Let sit for 10 minutes.
  6. After 10 minutes, remove the cake from the pan by inverting onto a plate or serving platter. Enjoy!


Recipe adapted from It’s the Little Thing’s Crack Cake

Share on YummlyShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Related Posts:

{ 24 comments… add one }
  • Ali @ Gimme Some Oven March 9, 2016, 3:41 pm

    This is absolutely beautiful, Samantha! And baking with white wine? Count me in. :)

    • Samantha March 11, 2016, 11:14 am

      Hi Ali! Thank you SO much for stopping by! The white wine and cinnamon combo in this cake make it totally addictive. You’ve been warned :)

  • Shevy March 15, 2016, 6:10 pm

    Hi Samantha, can you please tell me how many ounces of instant vanilla pudding you use for this recipe? Thanks!

    • Samantha March 16, 2016, 9:47 pm

      Hi Shevy! Thank you so much for pointing that out! I have updated the recipe- it’s 3.4 ounces. Let me know how you like the cake!

  • Shevy March 16, 2016, 10:07 pm

    Samantha, I made the cake last night and it’s half gone already, everyone loved it! Thanks so much for the recipe!! :)

    • Samantha March 17, 2016, 10:28 pm

      YAY! That’s great news! (Although honestly I’m not so surprised, since it is such a delicious cake.) Thanks so much for stopping by to let me know!

  • Susan March 27, 2016, 3:26 pm

    This is an easy, pretty cake. It is sooo moist and everyone enjoyed it.

    • Samantha March 27, 2016, 8:12 pm

      Hi Susan! Yay I’m so glad you all enjoyed! I agree, so easy and so pretty :)

  • Dana Cash October 12, 2016, 12:34 pm

    Can you use cooking wine

    • Samantha December 8, 2016, 1:52 pm

      Hi Dana! I would not recommend using cooking wine for this recipe. Since the wine is such an important flavor component, I would stick to a wine that you really enjoy drinking :)

  • Amy October 15, 2016, 8:15 pm

    This cake is delicious! I made it tonight but my was rather flat. I made it in a tube pan and it is only 3″ tall. What did I do wrong???

    • Samantha December 8, 2016, 1:51 pm

      Hi Amy! So glad you liked it! That is very strange that it was flat. Did you mix it with an electric mixer for the full 2 minutes? Did you accidentally use less eggs than it calls for? Those are the only things I could think of that may have gone wrong…

  • Joan dimmond October 30, 2016, 12:21 pm

    Ok so wine is in the cake batter and more in the glaze right?

    Also would red wine work? I don’t drink wine and my husband only drinks red. And is there any way to bake this in an angel food cake pan. I had a great bundt pan but it walked off. Thanks

    • Samantha December 8, 2016, 1:45 pm

      Hi Joan! Correct, wine is in the cake batter and the glaze. I haven’t tried it with red wine…it seems like it would work, although if the wine is more dry than white maybe add a couple more teaspoons of sugar to compensate. Let me know how it turns out if you try it! I don’t own an angel food pan or know much about them! Sorry! You could try finding a disposable tin bundt pan? I use them sometimes :)

  • Laurie Vanhoy November 8, 2016, 10:44 pm

    This cake is even better the next day. Letting it sit over. brings out the flavor even more.

    • Samantha December 8, 2016, 1:42 pm

      Hi Laurie! Agreed! So glad you enjoyed it, thanks so much for letting me know :)

  • June January 24, 2017, 12:12 pm

    About to make this. How can you poke holes in the bottom of cake while still in pan??

    • Samantha January 31, 2017, 4:42 pm

      Hi June! Sorry for the confusion! Since you invert the cake from the pan onto a serving plate, the “bottom” of the cake is really the top while it’s in the bundt pan. So poke holes in the exposed part of the cake while is in the pan. Make sense? Let me know how you like it!

  • Christine January 29, 2017, 9:24 pm

    I made this cake last night for my family it was all gone in a matter of hours my family loved it

    • Samantha January 31, 2017, 4:40 pm

      Christine! I’m so happy to hear that! Glad your family enjoyed :)

  • Kathy March 7, 2017, 9:59 am

    My cake tasted delicious but the cake was heavy and the slices were wet is this the way it should be? Thanks

    • Samantha March 7, 2017, 5:25 pm

      Hi Kathy! I’m so happy that you enjoyed it! Sounds like you made it exactly right, the cake is wet. This is what gives it such an amazing flavor and moist texture! It is heavier than your average piece of cake because there’s so much deliciousness in there. Definitely the opposite of a dry, bland cake :)

  • Michelle May 16, 2017, 3:39 pm

    LOVED the revised version of the original recipe, but most especially your take on the glaze!!! It was a most perfect texture. Did you ever share your Mom’s orange Bundt recipe? Thanks for a super HIT today at the lunch where I served this cake.

    • Samantha May 17, 2017, 10:26 am

      Michelle! I’m so happy to hear that it was a hit! And NO! I need to share her recipe ASAP! Thanks for the reminder and thanks so much for stopping by :)

Leave a Comment

Rate this recipe: